Everybody Grows Up

aaron gig

My son is almost 16. The education, health and human services sectors tell me that this is a transition time for him. Talk of transition is everywhere.  There are transition pamphlets and websites and apps and roadmaps thrown at me at every turn.

I hereby declare that I reject the term transition and say instead that Aaron is growing up. System-speak is everywhere: calling friends ‘peer support,’ brothers and sisters ‘siblings,’ and going home ‘discharge.’ I am officially dismissing system-speak. Falling into the habit of talking about our kids this way means we’ve given the power back over to the system. Language matters. I’m not going to let them turn my kid into a one-dimensional cliché of what they think a disabled kid is.

My other two kids grew up and Aaron is growing up too. Having Down syndrome doesn’t stop him from becoming an adult.

I’ve been thinking about why families put off planning for our disabled kids’ future. We have to apply for tax credits, try to work a lot to save money (somehow, while at the same time we have to provide caregiving), secure psycho-ed tests, apply to get an adult file open, meet with social workers, find physicians who will see our kids, forecast for life – our adult child’s and our own – after school ends, which includes limited and rather bleak options for post-secondary school, housing and employment.

This all sucks at a time when we should be surviving our kid’s puberty (which all parents have to do with all kids) and celebrating that our child is growing up. We should usher in their adulthood with joy not despair.

I am reminded of the time when Aaron was first diagnosed 16 long years ago. The joy of a baby’s birth is also taken away from families by the way a disability diagnosis is disclosed. There’s a lot of talk then about ‘burden and suffering’ from health professionals.  I say the joy of having a baby gets carted right out of the delivery room.

I’m not going to allow the joy to be taken this time around as my son reaches adulthood. The system tries its best to push me into misery with all their anguished forms, intake processes and assessments.

Growing up should be celebrated, not dreaded. It should be a time of hope and opportunity. Aaron is almost a man now, becoming more and more himself, his character brightly shining through. He wants to be an actor, so we are going to support him with that as far as he goes. I feel lucky to be his mom, to witness his transformation into adulthood.

The other day when we were driving in the car, Aaron turned to me and said: ‘Mom, I am an organic human being.’ Yes you are my son. Let’s celebrate that first. Let’s put you as an organic human being front and centre.

Of course I’ll do what I have to do to get on wait lists, secure funding and fill out forms. But this time I’m going to endeavour to not let the system crap wear me down. I don’t believe in their deficit-based approach. The system is not stealing joy like it did when he was born. I’m simply not going to to allow that this time around.   No way.  No more.  Not today.  I’m going to hang onto gratitude for my son with the extra chromosome as tightly as I can.

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