Pura Vida

I wish that every new family who finds out their baby has Down syndrome could see this goofy little video.  I wish that every physician who discloses a Down syndrome diagnosis would watch this too.

This is my son Aaron boogie boarding in Costa Rica last week.  Aaron is 15 years old and has Down syndrome.  He also gleefully jumped off the second level of a boat into the Pacific Ocean (four times) and went for a long hike in the jungle where we encountered a troupe of wild capuchin monkeys.  (That was AMAZING). These were all hard-fought victories for him.  It took many years of swimming lessons for Aaron to be confident enough to put his face in the water, never mind jump off a boat.  Even five years ago, he’d balk at the notion of going for any kind of walk by sitting on the ground and refusing to budge.  It has taken supportive community support folks, Physical Education teachers, Special Olympics, a move to a warmer climate and many meandering walks to the grocery store to get him to the point of hiking in the jungle.

Pura Vida is a popular saying in Costa Rica.  It roughly translates to ‘a slower life’ or a ‘pure life.’  A more literal translation from Spanish is ‘nothing but life.’

While Aaron is not on this earth to inspire us (as explained well by the late great Stella Young), he does live a full life.  I did not know this was possible when he was first born.  Everybody told us how hard life would be, but nobody told us about the Pura Vida.  Our family has made damn sure that Aaron lives a good life (and we do too, through our fortunate association with him).

How I wish I had a crystal ball during the dark time of Aaron’s diagnosis almost 16 years ago to catch this little glimpse into his future.  How I wish that instead of being handed that stupid book about every possible thing that could go ‘wrong’ with babies with Down syndrome that I had been connected with another family with an older child to see that our lives were not over. In fact, Aaron’s diagnosis offered us the beginning of a new life instead.  Yes, in many ways having a son with an intellectual disability has made our lives slower. But a slow life is not a bad life.  It is just a different life.  And don’t you think we all could use a sprinkling of a little Pura Vida too?  xo.

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