more bold actions please

smoke

I’m watching the events of the Canadian Medical Association’s Health Summit in Winnipeg unfold on Twitter.  I’m pleased they offered patient scholarships and that there are 27 Patient/Caregiver Advocates there in amongst the 700 health professionals, including a handful of my friends and colleagues, like Julie Drury, Donald Lepp and Courage Sings.  I admire them for their perseverance and commitment, as they have travelled great distances to show up because of their dedication to partnering with health professionals.  I’m sitting here in my bathrobe at my kitchen table, not even having bothered to apply for a scholarship.  I’m weary. I tip my hat to these patient/caregiver leaders.

At the very same time, there is a Doctors Stopping the Pipeline Bold Action and Witness Rally this morning, led by the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment (CAPE). Physicians have gathered at the Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, risking arrest if they get too close to the gates and violate the court injunction because they believe that climate change is a threat to public health. (I believe that to be true, too, and my husband is down at the rally representing our family).  The sky is thick with smoke from the wildfires today.  The sun is but a red dot in the sky.  I refuse to accept this as the new normal.  Wildfires have been made much worse by climate change.  It is time we connect the dots.

There are 700 physicians in a ballroom at the Convention Centre in Winnipeg and a handful of physicians standing before the Kinder Morgan gates in the suffocating smoke.  Thousands more physicians are working hard today in Canada in emergency rooms, surgery theatres and clinic offices.  They are doing the work that needs to be done, but something’s gotta to change.

(Patients are)…the greatest unused asset in health care system today – Dr. Brian Brodie, Chair Canadian Medical Association

This quote comes from Dr. Brian Brodie from the Health Summit this morning. While I wince at being called an asset, I agree with this philosophy and appreciate the notion of patient engagement has been identified as important concept for physicians.

I’m both a patient and a caregiver.  I’m always looking for opportunities to share my feedback, stories and wisdom with health professionals.  But post-cancer, I’m tired of having to be the one to hustle.  I put up my essays on my blog and whoever reads it, reads it.  I’m exhausted from begging for a seat at the grown up table.

What needs to change?  More bold action and more witnessing, like at the rally this morning.  If you want to partner with patients and families at point of care or in your organization, just start doing it already.  This would be a bold action.  Grab a page from the CAPE playbook and stand up for what you believe in.  Come to work every day to bear witness and hold space for the suffering of patients and families. Don’t turn away.  I’ve had enough with the hollow words on strategies and mission statements followed up with no sustainable change.

I hope that every one of those 700+ delegates leave the CMA Health Summit with a firm commitment to follow through on their bold actions.  I guarantee that change will not happen waiting around for the system to change.  Change will happen one single person at a time, and the only way we can do this is together.

One thought on “more bold actions please

  1. Carolyn Thomas says:

    “I’m exhausted from begging for a seat at the grown up table.”

    That line really hit home for me, Sue. Like you, I’m thrilled to hear about 27 patient/caregiver advocates being specifically invited to attend (don’t know if this was an accredited “Patients Included” event, as I too couldn’t muster up the energy to apply for a scholarship for this specific conference. Even when invited to speak at a medical event, I have to think long and hard about saying YES these days.

    I’ve heard those ‘eureka!’ moments voiced before (as you quote Dr. Brodie here, about what an “asset” having patients around is). I spoke here in June (my city, no travel, no hotels!) at an OB-GYN conference, to 400+ docs in a big theatre. The presentation evaluations were enlightening:
    – “Wonderful to include patient perspective – this is very effective at helping us see the effects of our care on women.”
    – “Having patient perspective was incredibly valuable.”
    – “The personal addition of the patient was extremely entertaining.”
    – “Great to have the cardiac patient share her perspective.”
    – “Very interesting to bring in a speaker with a personal story to reinforce the issue.”
    – “The patient speaker was extremely captivating!”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s