The Sinister Side of Patient Engagement

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I was a patient engagement person before there was such thing as patient engagement. Ten years ago, I was a mom who was hired by a hospital to advise leadership about family-centred care.  Back then, us family advisors were pioneers, cowboys in a new frontier.  The movement was focused on making the experience in the hospital better for families by creating a family council and it grew from there.

Something more sinister has accompanied this growth. While some hospitals maintain the purity of these patient engagement jobs by hiring those with lived experiences, others have sought to dilute it by hiring staff who do not even demonstrate compassion for the patients and families that they are supposedly to serve. Today, it is often clinicians who are hired into leadership positions in patient engagement, citing: ‘but everybody is a patient!’ – leaving authentic patients and families behind in their dust.

I’ve been despondent about this before, throwing my hands up and despairing: Patient Engagement Has Been Stolen From Patients, but after reading Isabel Jordan’s essay Patient Engagement: You’re Doing it WrongI grit my teeth and dig in my heels, solidifying this stance.   Please take the time to read Isabel’s important story.

How can these new Patient Engagement leaders get it so wrong? How is it that patients and families are used for their stories and then crudely discarded? Why has even the common courtesy of responding to emails gone? I’ve gone on and on about the best practice of patient engagement: here, here, here, here, here, here, here, herehere.  Here’s an example of best practice, to contrast Isabel’s horrible awful experience.

If you are working in the area of patient engagement, consider Isabel’s piece very carefully. If you truly are a professional, you will welcome constructive feedback and reflect on what you’ve learned and how you are going to change your practice based on your learnings.  Perhaps you see an element of yourself mirrored in her words.

If Patient Engagement is becoming a profession, there needs to be accountability for it. Like other health care professions, Patient Engagement needs to protect the public they serve – through common best practice, standards, training + continuing education requirements and a path for the public to report misconduct and follow up with disciplinary action. If the health professionals have stolen patient engagement from us patients, then they need to start acting like professionals. Not rude, inconsiderate and disrespectful of the people they are supposedly committed to collaborate with.

Thank you Isabel for sharing your story and wisdom with us. Please share her post widely with those who engage patients: in health authorities, governments, hospitals, research projects, health affiliated organizations – anybody who says they engage patients. Patient engagement, patient experience people – wondering if you are doing a good job?  Turn to the patients and families and ask them.  That’s the only way you’ll ever know.

Never forget, it is an honour to work with patients and families in any capacity. Words are hollow here. If you don’t demonstrate to us through your actions that you believe this work is about serving people, you are in the wrong field of work.  

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