the real people behind canada waits

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Yes, it’s a slug.

Last November, Globe and Mail health journalist Andre Picard encouraged Canadians to share their wait time stories through the hashtag CanadaWAITS.

I am a woman whose breast cancer diagnosis last year took three months from the time I went to my family physician with a lump in my breast to the day I got diagnosed. I can’t find any Canadian standards online about what the ideal wait time should be before diagnosis, but eleven years ago, a CBC article indicated that the median wait time in my home province of British Columbia was 2.9 weeks in the Fast Track Program or 4.1 weeks for those not in that program, like me.

Fast forward to 2017, I waited a total of 12 weeks in British Columbia from the time I presented to my family physician to when I was diagnosed.

Some smart ass on Twitter tried to debunk the whole Canada Waits concept by tweeting that the reasons for the wait times weren’t known so wait time stories were meaningless. I have news for you pal:  stories are never meaningless because there are real human beings behind these stories.  Patients are not statistics.  We might be a N of 1, but 1 is enough.

I’d bet money if you bothered to actually ask the patients about their wait times, they could give you insight into the reason for the delays.

Here is my story, presented without commentary (save for the occasional descriptive adjective):

  1. Time between my initial family doctor visit and mammogram was over a week. I called the mammogram place to set up an appointment the moment I left my doctor’s office and the first available appointment was nine days later – this was for both a screening mammogram (in my right breast) and a diagnostic mammogram (a more extensive mammogram in my ‘suspicious’ left breast).
  2. I was told at the mammogram (in a public waiting room, no less) that I needed an ultrasound right away and they could do it on the spot. But that the radiologist said my family physician ‘forgot to check the referral box’ for an ultrasound, so I would have to go back to my doctor for another referral.
  3. I dutifully called my family doctor, who was mortified and immediately sent over another referral. The soonest I could get in for the ultrasound was three weeks later, despite the fact I had a ‘concerning’ mammogram.
  4. At the ultrasound I was told (again in a public waiting room) that I needed two biopsies. They could have scheduled these biopsies three days later, but I made the mistake of mentioning that I have a bleeding disorder. The radiologist at the diagnostic imaging centre said they would not do my biopsies and that I needed a referral to the women’s hospital – which my family doctor immediately arranged.  (Note:  I never did meet this mysterious radiologist who held a lot of power over me – all the messages from him/her were relayed through technicians and receptionists).
  5. I received a call ten days later from the women’s hospital, telling me that I would need to see a hematologist before they would do my biopsies, which were scheduled 33 days after my ultrasound because the breast clinic at the women’s hospital was closed over Christmas holidays.
  6. My biopsies then got delayed an additional 16 days because the women’s hospital refused to start an IV on me so I could be infused with a clotting medication before my biopsies. This had to be done at the hematologist’s clinic, at a different hospital, on the same day I had my biopsies. The hematologist’s clinic was full – hence the extra delay. (On the day of my biopsy, I was given IV meds at one hospital and then my husband had to rush me over to another hospital to have the biopsies done).
  7. I received a call with my breast cancer diagnosis one week after my biopsies. Two days later I was meeting with a breast surgeon, and two weeks later I had a partial mastectomy. I began radiation therapy 5 weeks later.

It is interesting to deconstruct these delays. The main reasons for my elongated wait time were:

  1. The radiologist refused to do an ultrasound on the spot because my family doctor did not check the correct box on the referral form = 21 day delay.
  2. The women’s hospital was closed for between Christmas and New Years = 10 day delay.
  3. The women’s hospital would not start an IV for my meds before my biopsy = 16 day delay.
  4. The rest of my delays seem to have to do with old-fashioned wait times at both the diagnostic imaging centre and the women’s hospital. This might have to do with the volume of patients and/or staffing or physical space issues; I don’t know. One delay had to do with me having a bleeding disorder, so I guess that’s my own damn fault. (Note: yes, I did advocate for myself, calling receptionists and politely and persistently asking to get on cancellation lists and pleading my cause – to no avail).

I was speaking to a friend who had breast cancer and was treated in Hong Kong over ten years ago, and she went from mammogram to surgery in FOUR DAYS. I am not sure what best practice is – maybe there is such a thing as being too rushed. But there’s a big difference between 4 days and 84 days.

Did my cancer grow during that time? Sure it did, but I had (have?) a sluggish, slow-growing type of cancer so who knows if this caused me much physical harm. The harm I did experience was of the emotional kind instead.

In 1999, a research study in British Columbia found: These findings confirm that, regardless of its outcome, waiting for definitive diagnosis after an abnormal screening mammogram is an intense and often agonizing experience for the women involved and for their families.

We knew of this ‘agonizing’ time 19 years ago and I don’t think wait times have decreased since then.  As Adriana Barton pointed out in her recent superb article, the emotional harm caused from cancer treatment is well researched, but from my perspective, there are little to no mental health support or services offered to cancer patients.

I’d add harm is caused even before you get a diagnosis – so this includes the excruciating waiting time thrust on the scores of people who have benign results, not just those of us who end up with cancer.

In my experience, the health system does not seem to care one whit about preventing emotional suffering and harm. Patients and families care, most clinicians care, but health care administrators and government bureaucrats who create these punitive policies and processes? Not so much. Wait times are shrugged off as the Canadian Way.

I only hope that the more we share our real human stories behind #CanadaWAITS that somebody with influence and a heart will finally pay attention.  Patients and families, refuse to be silenced, even if they write you off as difficult or hysterical.  This is undue suffering and this is not okay.

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