the day i sobbed at the bakery

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I stopped by Gabi & Jules bakery yesterday to pick up an almond croissant and a maple pecan pie. By the end of my transaction, I was sobbing at the front counter, barely able to eke out any words, my face hot and embarrassed by my unexpected show of emotion.

Before the crying, I was perfectly composed and waiting in line to order my baked goods. There was a young man in front of me. I could tell he wanted to chat, so I turned and faced him and smiled. ‘All the food here is good!’ he said. ‘Have you tried everything?’ I asked. ‘YES!,’ he said, bursting to tell me.  ‘I work here! In the back.’

Now I could feel the tears beginning to well up. I swallowed them back as we chatted a bit more.   This young man had some sort of disability – autism maybe – but that doesn’t really matter. He was obviously very proud that he worked in the bakery.

Being employed is so much more than just a pay-cheque – it can offer a sense of value, worth and belonging.   This particular bakery in Port Moody is well known for its inclusive hiring practices. (Here’s a video and article explaining their philosophy).

After the young man left, I mentioned to the nice woman working behind the counter (Sarah, the manager) that my husband recently heard owner Lisa Beecroft speak at a panel for inclusive employment. I kept it together until this point, until I confessed, ‘Our son is 14 and he has Down syndrome. I hope one day an employer like you will give him a chance.’ Then my voice caught and the tears started to seep out. I managed to finish up before fleeing to my car, but not before Sarah said: ‘Bring your son in one day so he can look around!’ This made me cry even more. I’m sure she thought I was odd (and admittedly I am, especially since the dumb cancer, which seems to have broken me open emotionally).

When Aaron was born, I was clouded in many fears for his life: that he wouldn’t find love or belonging or friends or meaningful work. To be truthful, we are still working on helping him with his search for many of these things. I feel hope in my heart for the future with companies like Gabi & Jules taking a chance on all different kinds of people.

I started going to Gabi & Jules because I heard they hired people with disabilities and I wanted to support them. But now I’m a regular there because the baking is just so damn good. (The hazelnut tarts! The granola! And oh the pies). And now that I’ve met one of the bakers in the back, I have a strong sense, as their logo says, the maple pecan pie we ate last night was made with love.

gabi and jules

*Coming up next week! A special guest blog post from my husband, Mike Waddingham, talking about inclusive employment practices.

One thought on “the day i sobbed at the bakery

  1. Katharina Staub says:

    I can smell the croissant. That made me cry. We all just want to be part of and belong somewhere. And we want to be valued and loved.

    Cry on. It is healing. Love you.

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