his tell-tale heart

tell-taleAt lunch yesterday, Aaron was busy trying to us something he recently learned in English class. He said: the guy had a bird eye! A vulture! His heart was beating out of his chest! He was buried underground!

It took some Googling to figure out what he was talking about. He was referring to Edgar Allen Poe’s short story The Tell-Tale Heart.

This is what happens when you include a kid with a disability in a high school English class. Did he ‘get it’? Yes, he got it more than I did – me with my fancy English university degree, me who doesn’t know much Poe at all.

This isn’t the first time this has happened. A few weeks ago, Aaron arrived home from school with his journal.   In it, he had printed: We learned Romeo and Juliet today. It is a superb story by William Shakespeare. Later, his teacher told me he took a comprehension test about the play. He understood everything: who loved who, who hated who, who died. This is a kid who loves drama in real life. Of course he’d be drawn to it in literature too. He is his mother’s son.

Beth Foraker wrote a lovely piece on her blog about her son (age 14, who also happens to have Down syndrome) and his love of Macbeth.

There is a lot for both educators and parents to think about with these anecdotes. What preconceived notions do we possess about what kids with differences can and cannot learn? I thought about all the myths I carried about Down syndrome when Aaron was first diagnosed: that he would be mindlessly happy all the time (WRONG), that he wouldn’t understand sarcasm (WRONG), that he wouldn’t be a consumer (WHO TOLD ME THAT? SO WRONG). Did I think he would understand Edgar Allen Poe or Shakespeare? I hang my head in shame – no, this version of reality had not crossed my mind.

This holiday season I am thankful for Aaron for having proved me wrong, over and over again. I am grateful for educators like his English teacher. You never know what this kid might learn – we all just have to give him a chance. As Beth points out, this means giving our kids access to curriculum at school and access to rich experiences in life. She so eloquently says: Because we can never guess or know what will touch their hearts and speak to their soul.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s