the leave

IMG_0894

Each morning we wake up at our leisure, sit on the red couch and write our plan for the day in my little coil scribbler.

It often starts with an egg salad sandwich for breakfast and moves to ‘Mom work’ which means me closing myself in a windowless office for two hours to write while Aaron watches obnoxiously-loud Johnny Test on TV.  Then electronics off and we begin our time together.  The day stretches out before us like a prairie sky.

My mantras this summer, the summer of my leave, are this:
1. Stay in the moment
2. Move at Aaron’s pace

I rue the day 15 years ago when I said, in response to yelling at my then 5 + 8 year old children:  I wish I was a more patient mom.  The Baby Gods heard me and two years later they brought me a third child named Aaron.  I’ve calculated a direct correlation:  the faster I try to move Aaron along, the slower he goes.

So slow we go.  We pick one nature outing a day and sandwich that with meals, errands and meandering strolls.  I distinctly feel as if I’ve regressed ten years and am at home with a toddler instead of a budding teenager.  Aaron craves both routine and unstructured time with his people of comfort.  Why did I think I could sign him up for a variety of day camps, just like other moms do with their kids?  This year is a stark reminder that I am not just like other moms and Aaron is not just like other kids.  Even in contemplating this complex web of summer childcare arrangements, I was in denial about our differences. This leave is my humbling, a sign that I was getting too big for my britches.  It also shows me how a lack of childcare options for older children with disabilities pushes families into poverty.  (But that is another topic for another time).

So here we are, making lemonade out of life.  Despite the adolescent defiance, the need to negotiate every move and the mortification of being seen with his mother in public, he sidles up to me at least once a day and says, I love you Mom.  Other days, This is the best day ever.   His relief at not being dropped off at a different summer camp every week, complete with a different routine and different people, is palpable.  And that’s gotta be enough.  Enough for the lost income and the stalled career, for if you really try to live in the moment, you know the moments are soon over and then they are simply gone.

We’ve gone for hikes by canyons with little cousins, played an excessive amount of mini-golf, brought our bird book to the sanctuary to identify our feathered friends, munched on popcorn in dark air conditioned movie theatres.  Right now, I’m sitting on a log by the dog beach (is there anything more glorious than a beach of dogs?) and Aaron has buried himself deep in the coastline forest, emerging victorious with found sticks and talking to them as if they are people, as he’s apt to do.

I’ll add to my mantras ‘Be Weird’ as my boy is often weird (at least to the typically-developing eye) and I struggle with that reality, particularly in public.  My own deep-rooted 13 year old awkward teenage girl fear of being judged pops right to the surface.  When I ask him:  Why are you making that funny sound? he wisely and matter-of-factly tells me:  It is the Down syndrome way.

Today he picked up a black rock and announced:  This is an asteroid!   Then he scrambled up on a big ocean rock and yelled:  THIS ROCK IS REALLY INTENSE MOM!  Last night, munching on a chorizo taco:  This meal is phenomenal!  He doesn’t stop talking in exclamation marks, except when presented with direct questions from boring adults.

[Many years ago, when Aaron was two, I belonged to a playgroup of kids with disabilities. I remember complaining that Aaron would not stop saying:  mom mom mom mom all the time.  Another mom looked at me with sadness in her eyes and said:  I wish my daughter would say my name, even once.  Her little girl had Angelman syndrome and did not talk at all.  I hung my head in shame, my face flush with my own stupidity.  It was the first of many reminders to watch my words and count my blessings].

Aaron couples his love of language with a never-ending string of knock knock jokes:

Aaron: Knock knock.
Me:  Who is there?
Aaron:  G.
Me:  G who?
Aaron:  God.

Me:  Huh?  That’s it?  God?  What does that mean?
Aaron:  … {Shrugs. Sly grin}.

All children offer up both joy and pain, happy and sad.  If I uncensor myself, I will confess that it is easier to be at my work:  dressed up, adult, respected, uninterrupted in the washroom. In my leave I have left that.  I am dressed down, a mom, invisible and interrupted in the washroom.

Aaron and I have eight more weeks together, but I am going to stop counting.  Life, I tip my hat to you: I’ve been knocked off my pedestal once again, but I want to tell you that the view down here ain’t half-bad.

4 thoughts on “the leave

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s