my lady bits

Screen Shot 2018-03-09 at 3.52.36 PM

First my boobs tried to kill me last year (when I had breast cancer) and then my ovary gave it a go too.  Here’s my story of my first responder and Emergency Department experience on Tuesday night.  Edited to add:  to understand the philosophy behind writing during illness, check out Sharon Bray’s wonderful blog called Writing Through Cancer.

It is 11:30 pm on a regular Tuesday night when I’m jolted awake with excruciating pain. It is as if someone has stabbed me in the lower right abdomen. It doesn’t go away or recede – just a constant pain as if I had just been knifed. Not like I’ve ever been stabbed, but still. I imagine this is what it feels like.

My only comfort is to sit up and fold in half over my sore side. Don’t touch me! I say to Mike, silently calculating what is the quickest route to pain medication. It isn’t having Mike figure out childcare and then drive me to the hospital and then wait in the waiting room. Call an ambulance I say.  I don’t care how much it costs.

Are they coming? Are they coming? I keep asking. I’m hyperventilating, shivering and my legs are tingly. I can hear the fire truck roar up six flights below.

Our buzzer rings and all I can see is three sets of large brown boots in my bedroom. They are asking me questions. I’m trying to answer. I can’t look up. They put an oxygen mask on me and leave the mask remnants behind in the bedroom.  They stand over me until the ambulance arrives.

Don’t wake up Aaron, I keep saying. Mercifully, my son sleeps with ear protection on (long story) and remains asleep. I get on the stretcher. I am keen not to traumatize him.  I keep having to straighten out so I can fit through doorways and elevators, but sitting up is agony and I hunch back over the first chance I can get, trying to fold over like an accordion. Someone starts an IV in my inner arm and I don’t care. The ride is bumpy, I ask for a puke bag and they give me Gravol. Nobody wants me to puke everywhere, including me. Someone keeps updating me on how close they are to the hospital. I don’t know if the lights are on, there are no sirens – I’m not dying, only in pain – there’s no use in waking up the entire neighbourhood. I’m trying just to breathe. The paramedics take bets that I have appendicitis.

My first time in the back of an ambulance and it is bumpy. Once we are there, I bumpity bump out of the ambulance. I finally look up to see the paramedics and thank them for being good guys. There’s mercifully no wait. I’m in a bed in a curtained room, there’s misery all around me and now it is 12:30 am. There are vitals and my heart rate has calmed down considerably. The gruff but thorough doctor who shows up says I don’t have appendicitis, for appendicitis doesn’t start suddenly like that. He thinks kidney stones but I’m like, noooo it’s an ovary cyst, which he shrugs off. I have cysty ovaries, I croak. I’m not making any sense or he doesn’t listen to me or both. I am a lady with lady problems.

The morphine makes me woozy but the pain is still there. Mike shows up, having woken up his sister to stay at the house. (Why didn’t he knock on the neighbour’s door? He dragged his poor sister out of bed, but I’m so grateful to her for driving bleary eyed up the mountain to stay with Aaron).

Mike sources a steno chair and sleeps on that. A nurse kindly offers him a blanket. I ask again for pain meds because the stupid morphine doesn’t work and Mike shushes me, thinking I look like I’m seeking drugs. I AM seeking drugs because there is a knife in my belly. I shuffle to the bathroom and then throw up my Tuesday night chili dinner into a cardboard bowl. I get a new pain med – a stinging IM needle in my arm – I don’t mind, it is a distraction from my belly pain, which I’m still trying to breathe through, one breath at a time. This is like labour with no baby at the end. They keep asking me what number is my pain and I keep saying: EIGHT! EIGHT! Like late labour! They give me Dilaudid, which my daughter Ella tells me later is four times the strength of morphine and THAT makes the pain finally go away. Or it makes my head think the pain has gone away – no matter, I have some relief, after three hours of writhing agony.

Some hours pass. I doze in and out, listening to babies crying, people screaming, some security incident. The meds make me don’t care.  It is morning and Mike has to leave to get Aaron ready for school. I’m waiting for my ultrasounds and I realize my meds must have worn off because I’m no longer in pain. The knife has been removed from my belly.

Of course the ultrasounds show nothing. There is a vaginal one too, how fun, with the condom-covered dildo camera. For my abdominal scan, the tech is annoyed my bladder isn’t full – I’m like – well they put me on NPO so sorry. I can’t drink anything. I can tell I’m no longer in pain or stoned because I’m getting pissed off. The tech is teaching a student which normally I don’t mind but it takes forever. She’s also talking to me as if I’m about four years old.

I wait in the hall on a stretcher afterwards for a long time and my doctor happens to walk by. He goes to check my ultrasound. It has shown nothing. I know this is because the cyst has already burst. He’s still talking kidney stones and I’m repeat, nooooo, I have cysty ovaries. He shrugs again. I’m another woman with woman problems. He’s a tough guy but his saving grace is his sense of humour. I make feeble attempts to joke about my cysty ovaries and at least I extract a smile from him.

I text Mike to come pick me up and a crabby nurse takes out my IV. I hold the bandage on my IV site for a while and when I let it go, blood starts gushing out of my arm. Um, excuse me? I stick my head out of the curtain. I’m a bleeder here. She sighs and gets me another bandage. I get dressed and sit on the bed to wait for Mike. She tells me to leave. I look around.  It is 9 am and the ward is empty.  I’m like – I don’t know where to go, an ambulance brought me in. You just follow the green line, she says crossly. I follow the green line outside and stand in the rain and the cold in my pajamas with no coat on and wait for my ride. I see how people are discharged into -40 weather and later die in a snowbank. Honestly, hospitals could say good-bye a bit better. They are like a bad, abusive boyfriend. Get the hell out! they yell when they are done with you.

I sleep all day and then sleep all night too. I think that pain has worn me down more than anything. Today is the next day and I’m tired too. It is grey and raining. I am reminded how complicated the lady bits are. I am grateful for faceless firemen, bumpy ambulance rides, chatty paramedics and almost all of the Emergency Department staff. I understand the desperation to get through that kind of pain. I am thankful that I remembered my labour breathing.

One breath at a time; that’s the only way we can get through. Today I cut off my hospital ID bracelet, scraped the bandage glue off my arm and am humbled once again by the fragility of this thing called life.

The Wonder


My kids: Ella, Isaac + brand new Aaron, 2003.

Note: this essay is based on my talk at The Wonder Years Workshop at the Edmonton Down Syndrome Society on February 25, 2018.  It was a true honour to speak to this group of new families who have babies with Down syndrome.

My youngest son is now almost 15 years old. The trajectory of our entire family’s lives changed when his doctor uttered the words ‘Down syndrome.’ I’ll never forget that moment – I can remember every detail – how the room smelled and even the shoes my doctor was wearing.

Aaron’s diagnosis was a significant time for me, bordering on the traumatic. The baby we expected was not the baby we got. I irrationally blamed myself, thinking I was too old and I had grown up too close to the refineries – irrational thoughts when I was neck-deep in grief.

As the years have passed, the intense grief has faded as I’ve realized that there is loss associated with parenting all children. No child is perfect and all children are hard work. But with typically developing children, we learn this lesson gradually as they grow up. With our kids with Down syndrome, we are told this immediately upon diagnosis. For me, it felt as if I had been hit by a truck.

We must honour the healing that comes from the dark times. For many months, I felt like I had a suffocating blanket thrown over my head. I was mourning the loss of the so-called perfect baby. I had to grieve for the baby I thought I was going to have in order to accept the baby I got. My baby boy did not allow me to stay stuck in the grief. Looking back, there were many factors that helped me move forward to see the light again. I want to share my story of gradually appreciating the wonder that is our son.

Coming to The Wonder Years is an important step to start building your own community. Finding other moms who had babies with Down syndrome saved me. Fifteen years ago, there were no moms groups, no EDSS office space – but us four moms with our tiny, flexible babies with almond eyes – found each other. We would get together every month at each other’s houses with our wee ones. Helga, Veronica and Karen were my saving grace. They knew what it was like to have an unexpected child with Down syndrome and we could talk to each other freely and without judgment.

Today Aaron is friends with these (now) teenagers, who he first met when he was 5 months old. He and Helga’s son Vincent spend a glorious weekend each summer on their family boat in the Okanagan – endlessly jumping off into the lake, tubing and engaging in rowdy burping contests. Aaron and Veronica’s son Andrew Face Time each other regularly – I can hear the two of them roaring with laughter on the iPad in Aaron’s room. These friendships in my new community began by helping me, a lonely sad mom – but have evolved into deeper relationships for our entire family, including our son with Down syndrome. Aaron needed to find his own people too. However you find your peeps – through in-person connections, via social media – it doesn’t matter. When you are ready, reach out. You will need each other throughout the years.

My personality is good for people – for love – like my family. –Aaron, age 15

Having Aaron in our lives has changed our entire family. He has infused all of us with wonder. He has two older siblings who were 6 and 9 when he was first born. His sister Ella, now 21 and in third year nursing school, reflected back on how Aaron has made a difference in her life:

Aaron has taught me to be more patient and more inclusive, accepting and nonjudgmental at an earlier age than most of my peers. Honestly, it is cheesy to say but he truly is a bright light in this world. He’s kind, smart and HILARIOUS and he changes the lives and opinions of everyone who takes the time to get to know him. He’s why I wanted to be a nurse – not to cure sick people, but to see the spark that is so often ignored in vulnerable populations.

Aaron’s older brother shares similar sentiments, adding that Aaron has greatly strengthened his compassion. And my husband, Aaron’s dad, emphasizes that Aaron has challenged him in ways he didn’t expect, but also warns not to underestimate your child’s ability to learn or enjoy the things you enjoy. (For example, Aaron loves swimming competitively, watching Oilers’ hockey and eating hamburgers just like his dad). The majority of our children’s genes come from their mom and dad – it is only the one chromosome that is extra. Don’t forget that our kids are more like us than they are like Down syndrome.

My friend KC offers up this wisdom: throw out the milestone charts and celebrate every hard-won achievement. Only surround yourself with family and friends who love and support you and your child, she says. Make connections with other families within your new community and keep them close. And be flexible in the direction you choose – there are lots of decisions about therapy, preschool, recreation that will need to be made. You will make the best decision at the time and it is okay if that choice doesn’t stay the same. As your child grows and changes, you will too. This constant recalibration is hard for those of us who want control and a crystal ball in life. I’ll add: listen to your heart; it will always tell you what to do.

Speaking of hearts, please remember to be kind to yourself in this new life. Find yourself safe spaces where you can feel all your feelings.   You don’t have to be strong all the time. Do more of what nourishes you. Often we search for meaning once we’ve had a child with Down syndrome – we do this through our necessary advocacy work to make the world a better place for those with differences. This is important work, but also remember to take time for yourself, your partner and your kids too. Changing the world is exhausting so it is crucial to take breaks and allow others to take their turn to change the world too. It is hard to be vulnerable and ask for help, but that’s what I’ve had to do.

As Natalie Merchant says in her song Wonder:

 I believe, fate, fate smiled
Destiny laughed as she came to my cradle
Know this child will be able
Laughed as my body she lifted
Know this child with be gifted
With love, with patience, and with faith
She’ll make her way.

You and your child can – and will – live a good and rich life. Have love, patience and faith (whatever faith means to you) and listen closely to your child with Down syndrome. You and your baby are valued, worthy and loved. I promise that your child, above all else, will be the one to help you find your way.

make space for the suffering

Screen Shot 2018-03-01 at 9.52.46 AM

The older I get, the more conflicted I feel about everything.  I hope feeling conflicted is in fact related to my growing sense of humility as I open up to other points of view.  The more I know, the more I know I don’t know.

I used to despise the word suffering, as it is misused all the time in reference to people with disabilities.  The horrific term ‘burden and suffering’ is often widely applied to human beings with differences, both before and after they are born.  I still call bullshit on this stereotyping of other human beings in order to categorize them as less human.

So I dismissed the word suffering outright until I was diagnosed with cancer last year.  It was then I felt the true meaning of suffering, as the past few months have been fraught with unresolved physical and emotional pain which was triggered by my cancer.  I continue to heal from that experience.

I encountered Carlyn Zwarenstein’s writing about pain a few months ago.  She invited me to look at the notion of suffering in her important book called Opium Eater, The New Confessions.   Opium Eater is a small but mighty book that examines the use of legal opioids to manage chronic pain, looking at the historical, economical and emotional aspects of alleviating pain. Carlyn deftly draws upon the literary world for understanding. Andrew Sullivan’s recent New York article The Poison We Pick also tackles the concept of pain.  He identifies pain as simmering underneath the terrible mounting opioid overdose deaths.  As he explains about opioids: It is a story of pain and the search for an end to it.

A year ago, I wouldn’t have comprehended the depths of such pain.  But today I have a glimmer of understanding.  While I am privileged enough to keep pain at bay with the occasional Ativan and regular therapy sessions, cancer has humbled me enough for me to glimpse at the great suffering in this messed up, beautiful world.

Part of my own healing has been writing.  A few months ago, I was asked by Dr. Janice Bell to write a guest editorial for the Journal of Family Nursing about my perspective on suffering.  It was published yesterday and is called Make Space for the Suffering.

I’m pleased that health care academic journals are starting to make space for the patient voice on their prestigious pages.  I believe the inclusion of the patient voice makes their pages even more prestigious (and legit).  This most recent editorial is a plea for health professionals not to turn away from patients’ and families’ pain.

I will continue to say over and over again – I’m a broken record – as I dare you, health professionals, families and friends, to draw upon compassion and not turn away from our pain:

Healers turn toward patients and families during their pain. A warm gesture, kind word, or gentle touch reminds us that we are not alone and makes space for our suffering. While health care can (sometimes) cure, it is love that will heal us in the end.

Twenty Days Last May, part II

Screen Shot 2018-02-19 at 12.21.36 PM

(A prompt from my writing class:  describe a moment you are at peace)

For twenty days in between appointments, I walked. I walked in concentric circles around the hospital – down to False Creek, up the Cambie hill, west to the fancy shops and east to the hipsters with their big beards.

For twenty days, I looked for a picture. In the hospital, all my photos were taken in black and white. But outside out on my stroll, I searched for colour.

I snapped a tabby cat sunning on a step, the city view peeking through the condos and a bicycle parked against a tree, its basket filled with flowers. Once a crow flew at me on 10th street, angered I had passed too close to its babies. I continued on. There was a coffee shop filled with books, a burgundy mosaic pattern on a store floor and the blossoms slowly filling the tree canopies with early spring.

On my last day of those long 20 days of treatment, I spotted some graffiti on an alley wall. It was a perfect pink circle with stencilled words that simply said – you are here.  And that is enough.  xo.

Screen Shot 2018-02-19 at 12.24.22 PM

The Sinister Side of Patient Engagement


I was a patient engagement person before there was such thing as patient engagement. Ten years ago, I was a mom who was hired by a hospital to advise leadership about family-centred care.  Back then, us family advisors were pioneers, cowboys in a new frontier.  The movement was focused on making the experience in the hospital better for families by creating a family council and it grew from there.

Something more sinister has accompanied this growth. While some hospitals maintain the purity of these patient engagement jobs by hiring those with lived experiences, others have sought to dilute it by hiring staff who do not even demonstrate compassion for the patients and families that they are supposedly to serve. Today, it is often clinicians who are hired into leadership positions in patient engagement, citing: ‘but everybody is a patient!’ – leaving authentic patients and families behind in their dust.

I’ve been despondent about this before, throwing my hands up and despairing: Patient Engagement Has Been Stolen From Patients, but after reading Isabel Jordan’s essay Patient Engagement: You’re Doing it WrongI grit my teeth and dig in my heels, solidifying this stance.   Please take the time to read Isabel’s important story.

How can these new Patient Engagement leaders get it so wrong? How is it that patients and families are used for their stories and then crudely discarded? Why has even the common courtesy of responding to emails gone? I’ve gone on and on about the best practice of patient engagement: here, here, here, here, here, here, here, herehere.  Here’s an example of best practice, to contrast Isabel’s horrible awful experience.

If you are working in the area of patient engagement, consider Isabel’s piece very carefully. If you truly are a professional, you will welcome constructive feedback and reflect on what you’ve learned and how you are going to change your practice based on your learnings.  Perhaps you see an element of yourself mirrored in her words.

If Patient Engagement is becoming a profession, there needs to be accountability for it. Like other health care professions, Patient Engagement needs to protect the public they serve – through common best practice, standards, training + continuing education requirements and a path for the public to report misconduct and follow up with disciplinary action. If the health professionals have stolen patient engagement from us patients, then they need to start acting like professionals. Not rude, inconsiderate and disrespectful of the people they are supposedly committed to collaborate with.

Thank you Isabel for sharing your story and wisdom with us. Please share her post widely with those who engage patients: in health authorities, governments, hospitals, research projects, health affiliated organizations – anybody who says they engage patients. Patient engagement, patient experience people – wondering if you are doing a good job?  Turn to the patients and families and ask them.  That’s the only way you’ll ever know.

Never forget, it is an honour to work with patients and families in any capacity. Words are hollow here. If you don’t demonstrate to us through your actions that you believe this work is about serving people, you are in the wrong field of work.  

advocate me

sue patient

This post is a follow up from my interview with Donna Thomson for The Caregivers’ Living Room and was written for + originally published on the Cancer Knowledge Network.

I never wanted to be an advocate. I’m a conflict-adverse introvert by nature. When my youngest son was born with Down syndrome, the title of Advocate was foisted upon me. I was also suddenly a Special Needs Mom. These were clubs I never signed up for.

Thrown neck-deep into the health system with a baby with medical issues, I quickly learned to speak up at specialists’ offices to get my questions answered. I figured out that most advocacy work is relationship-based, which means if you have a relationship with the person you are directing your advocacy efforts towards, things will go much better.

To paraphrase Guy Kawasaki, a magnificent cause can overcome a prickly personality, but why make things harder? I got to know my son’s clinicians and recognized the value of chitchat, being nice, giving thank you cards and remembering people’s birthdays.

I’ve been to protests and marches to call for fair government funding for people with disabilities. I’ve spoken to the media about policies that segregate my kid. I lobbied a children’s hospital to start up a medical Down syndrome clinic and then fought hard when an administrator tried to shut it down a few years later. I have a fierce reputation as a strong advocate and I would take a bullet for any of my children.

Last year my advocacy efforts came to a screeching halt when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. Many people said watch out cancer world, strong advocate Sue Robins is here – but all that bravado did not come to pass. I’ve often failed miserably at advocating for myself as a cancer patient. Newly diagnosed, I was meek, prickly and vulnerable. Intellectually, I knew what to do to speak up for myself in stark oncology clinics, but emotionally I sat as still as a little mouse, hunched over, compliant and broken.

It had been easier to advocate for my son. He was one step removed from me, and I could hide behind my role of the strong Mama Bear. Cancer is exceedingly personal and not one step removed at all, for my own cells have turned rogue on me. Breast cancer is an especially intimate sort of cancer – my breast tumour was an affront to my feminine body.

Sitting in exam rooms in thin gowns, exposing my breasts to strange hands and painful machines, I couldn’t figure out a way to salvage my dignity, never mind advocate for myself. I was stripped bare, as small as a little girl. Be brave and strong, they said. I was scared and weak instead.

People who knew me from the disability world told me to buck up, to advocate for myself as I had for my son. This call to action was not what I needed; it only served to pile guilt at my own helplessness on top of me. I simply craved compassion instead.

I slowly turned to writing to process my cancer patient experiences using both a personal journal and my blog. Even if I was unable to speak up during an appointment, I could write about it afterwards. On my blog, this caused me some trouble.

Cancer hospitals don’t like accounts of experiences, even anonymous ones, unless they are positive. Many of my own touches with health care were traumatic and a number of encounters were even unkind. I asked their patient engagement person if there was a way to share my photos I had taken during radiation and she told me they don’t ‘privilege’ one patient’s story over another. Then she added that the writing on my blog was raw. More injured, I left the public eye and turned inward.

This took funny turns – I signed up for a poetry workshop class and wrote about cancer in poetry. This was freeing – I could fictionalize my experiences and not be worried about being factual. A friend kindly showed me how to make a collage from my radiation photos that the cancer hospital wasn’t interested in. Art was a different way to speak up for myself. I was advocating, but coming at it sideways, not in a clinic room.

I poked my head back into published writing. A leader in radiation therapy asked me to co-author a journal article about my experience having radiation. A nursing professor asked me to write a guest editorial for her journal about suffering. I am hopeful my story leaves remnants for clinicians to pause to consider how patients feel when they are in their care. While this might not help me, this may help others behind me in the cancer world. Making meaning from my experience helps me heal too.

There are many ways to speak up for ourselves. Some people fundraise, lobby governments, give direct feedback to clinicians, and bring along support people to appointments to help given themselves a voice. Other folks just hang in there, endure and try to forget about the whole damn thing. That’s okay too.

Just as there’s not one right way to do cancer, there’s not one right way to advocate. The most important thing is to be kind and forgiving of yourself as you find your own way.

the gerber baby


This is a slide from one of my presentations to health professionals explaining the reality of having a child with a disability.  This is a picture of a Gerber Baby, a so-called blue ribbon, or perfect baby.

This week, the Internet is abuzz that the new Gerber Baby has Down syndrome.

Screen Shot 2018-02-09 at 3.30.48 PM

Gerber Baby Lucas Warren

I’m obviously going to have to rethink my presentation slide.  My point was that we all expect a perfect baby when our children are born.  The honest fact is that no child is perfect, but with most children, this is something we gradually figure out as the years pass – particularly when adolescence hits and we get the inevitable call from the principal’s office.  Our job as parents is to help our children embrace their imperfections, for that’s what makes them – and all of us – human.

If you have a child with Down syndrome, the fact your child isn’t perfect is immediately pointed out by many people upon diagnosis.  I am happy for Lucas’ family and I know that having a baby with Down syndrome represent the Gerber Baby is a big deal for new families.  I’ve seen lots of sharing of Lucas’ image on social media and indeed, this news should be celebrated.  It is great that children with differences are starting to get a shot at modelling.  I pause here to say how I wish we were more evolved as a society and this wasn’t big news at all; that the advertising world chose images that represented the diversity of our world – including diversity of ability.  But that’s me with my rose-coloured glasses on.

buddy walk

Aaron is the dude in the middle

When my son Aaron was three, he was chosen to be on a campaign to advertise a Buddy Walk, an annual fundraiser for organizations who support people with Down syndrome.  We were thrilled to see his image on the sides of buses and up on billboards.

I understand how validating this Gerber Baby news is for us families who are anxious about the reception our children will be received in the world.  Lucas will be a role model for families with young children, no doubt.  We search for role models for now-14 year old Aaron, too – in television shows with stars with Down syndrome like Born this Way or through plays like King Arthur’s Night, co-written and starring Niall McNeil, who has an extra chromosome like my boy.  Aaron needs to see other people with Down syndrome in the public eye to show him what’s possible.  It affirms his very existence.

Having Lucas as the Gerber Baby will bring awareness to babies with Down syndrome. But will this mean the world will start to change to embrace disabilities?

“I’m skeptical this is a significant moment,” said David Perry on CBC’s The Current this morning.  I feel jaded saying this, but I agree with David.  We have to go further.  Awareness is not even a start to anywhere significant.  Awareness is just awareness.  We can’t pat ourselves on the back for being so progressive that Lucas’ modelling gig represents great change in a world that continuously and repeatedly discriminates against people with all sorts of disabilities.  That would naive and foolish.

I’ve written before about The Cute Thing.  Lucas is super cute, as was Aaron during his brief modelling career.  Aaron grew up and Lucas will grow up, too. We all grow up.  Teenagers and adults are not cute, whether they have Down syndrome or not.  Are those who are not cute – for whatever reason – simply discarded, if cute is all important?  Is it only those people with disabilities who make us feel better about ourselves (a disturbing phenomenon called Inspiration Porn, as explained by the late great Stella Young) the only people of value?

I don’t know the Gerber Product Company’s intentions by choosing a baby with Down syndrome to be their Gerber Baby.  I’d hanker a guess that it is for the same reason they choose any baby:  an attractive baby helps them sell products. The baby food business is big business.  I note that Gerber was sold to Nestle in 2007.  I’ve boycotted Nestle products since the mid-1990’s, ever since I found out about their unethical marketing of infant formula – allegations of which continue today.

I do so wish this news was associated with a more ethical company.

What I’m asking for is for us to consider: Is that all there is?  When a large corporation chooses a baby with Down syndrome to represent their product, does this mean that my son’s own life is going to improve?  Will he now have friends?  Will I have funding for therapies, respite or childcare for him now? Will he be able to find a job?  Love? Will he be safe as he makes his way in this world?  These are deeper questions that bubble up for me.

As I said about cancer, awareness is simply not enough.  It is a feel-good road to nowhere, unless it is followed up by real action:  a change in practice about how prenatal screening and testing is offered to women, a commitment to inclusive education + employment opportunities, equitable health care and governments who demonstrate they value all sorts of diversity.  For sure, let’s pause to celebrate the new Gerber Baby. Then let’s roll up our sleeves and get to work.